Everyday Athletes Need Yoga For Recovery To Improve Performance

A short Yoga for Recovery routine helps everyday athletes like cyclists and runners recovery more quickly and build mobility.

Three Awesome Benefits Of Using Yoga for Recovery

  • When you use yoga for recovery, it’s a great tool for creating some movement to counter tight hip flexors, shoulders, and neck.
  • Yoga is great for building strength and mobility. We spend a lot of time moving forward in one plane. Yoga strengthens twisting and lateral muscles and movement.
  • Finally, practicing yoga breathing improves performance on the bike and on the trail.

Yoga for Recovery helps everyday athletes improve mobility as well as blood flow to muscles that need recovery from our workouts. 

We’re not talking about flexibility. 

We might have stiff hips as runners and cyclists. 

But we need a certain level of stiffness since our legs act as springs. 

When we purposefully move with our breathing, we’re able to increase blood flow, which flushes out the byproducts of hard workouts. 

And that speeds our recovery.

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Yoga Helps Everyone

Yoga has so many benefits for everyday athletes, like runners and cyclists.

  1. When you use yoga for recovery, it’s a great tool for creating some movement to counter tight hip flexors, shoulders, and neck.
  2. Yoga is great for building strength and mobility. We spend a lot of time moving forward in one plane. Yoga strengthens twisting and lateral muscles and movement.
  3. Finally, practicing yoga breathing improves performance on the bike and on the trail.

Everyday Athletes Need Yoga For Recovery

I did a very short yoga for recovery routine for immediately after a run or ride. You can do the whole routine or break out some of the parts.

I created this in my garage studio to help everyday athletes be able to improve mobility and recovery for the next day’s workout.

I usually always do the hip mobility work with the low lunge to half split and runner’s lunge to Dragon Fly twist since my hip flexors are what is usually tight after a ride.

Here are the poses:

  • Mountain Pose/ Back Bend/ Rag Doll
  • Low Lunge/ Half-Split
  • Runner’s Lunge/ Dragon Fly
  • Sphinx/ Baby Cobra/ Cobra
  • Bow/ Half-Frog
  • Full Pigeon
  • Supine Twist

Yoga for Recovery Means Active Movement

The key to doing yoga is to NOT hold the pose as a static stretch. 

Research suggests that passive stretching – or holding a single position – can be harmful to performance in running and cycling.

Instead, be more active in your movement.

For a twist pose, lengthen your spine or relax slightly on the inhale and on the exhale, twist a little deeper.

With other poses, relax the position a little on the inhale, and move a little more deeply into the pose on the exhale.

For example, when you’re in the Low Lunge pose with your hands on your knees, rise up a bit on the inhale and push forward a little on the exhale. 

Come up on the inhale, and push back into the half-split on the exhale.

Do this very slowly and purposefully.

Individual and Group Yoga Sessions

I teach a 30-minute Yoga for Everyday Athletes class on Tuesday mornings at 6 am and Thursday evenings at 6 pm. 

Plus, I teach a 15-minute Yoga for Recovery class Monday evenings at 7:30 on the Simple Endurance Coaching Facebook page. 

You can purchase a monthly membership for the classes for the price of four classes.

Plus the membership gives you complete access to the Yoga Class Library.

I also have a six-week Yoga for Everyday Athletes course that is designed specifically to develop strength and mobility in runners and cyclists.

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